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Pastors as the New Public Intellectuals
The super-rich are funding thought leaders to justify their wealth. Pastors who preach from the bible have a different function. A review of Daniel W. Drezner's book.

By David Sessions

Editor's Note: The following article does not speak specifically about pastors. But over the years I have compared the role of the pastor with the notion of a "public intellectual." And this article contrasts that role with that of a "thought leader" hired by the wealthy to justify their wealth. Anthropologists have said there are two basic kinds of religion. One type seeks to affirm and justify the current system of power in a society. The other criticizes and seeks to change it. The bible contains both types, both royal psalms, for example, that extoll Zion, Israel's place of power, but also the ministry of Jesus where he cleanses the temple of money changers who defraud the people. The article here refers to "new public intellectuals" as something happening now in our highly volatile political environment. Reading this may help pastors situate themselves, help them understand their role in society as not someone who simply affirms the well off but who speaks a critical word of grace and justice in the specific context of our times. This today has become a very high calling, indeed. Illustration by Sue Coe.

Writing in one of Mussolini’s prisons in the 1930s, the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci jotted down the fragments that would become his theory of intellectuals. New classes, like the European bourgeoisie after the Industrial Revolution, he proposed, brought with them their own set of thinkers, which he called “organic intellectuals”—theorists, technicians, and administrators, who became their “functionaries” in a new society. Unlike “traditional intellectuals” who held positions in the old class structure, organic intellectuals helped the bourgeoisie establish its ideas as the invisible, unquestioned conventional wisdom circulating in social institutions.

Today, Gramsci’s theory has been largely overlooked in the ongoing debate over the supposed decline of the “public intellectual” in America. Great minds, we are told, no longer captivate the public as they once did, because the university is too insular and academic thinking is too narrow. Such laments frequently cite Russell Jacoby’s The Last Intellectuals (1987), which complained about the post-1960s professionalization of academia and waxed nostalgic for the bohemian, “independent” intellectuals of the earlier twentieth century. Writers like the New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof attribute this sorry state of affairs to the culture of Ph.D. programs, which, Kristof claims, have glorified “arcane unintelligibility while disdaining impact and audience.” If academics cannot bring their ideas to a wider readership, these familiar critiques imply, it is because of the academic mindset itself.

In his book The Ideas Industry, the political scientist and foreign policy blogger Daniel W. Drezner broadens the focus to include the conditions in which ideas are formed, funded, and expressed. Describing the public sphere in the language of markets, he argues that three major factors have altered the fortunes of today’s intellectuals: the evaporation of public trust in institutions, the polarization of American society, and growing economic inequality. He correctly identifies the last of these as the most important: the extraordinary rise of the American superrich, a class interested in supporting a particular genre of “ideas.”

The rich have, Drezner writes, empowered a new kind of thinker—the “thought leader”—at the expense of the much-fretted-over “public intellectual.” Whereas public intellectuals like Noam Chomsky or Martha Nussbaum are skeptical and analytical, thought leaders like Thomas Friedman and Sheryl Sandberg “develop their own singular lens to explain the world, and then proselytize that worldview to anyone within earshot.” While public intellectuals traffic in complexity and criticism, thought leaders burst with the evangelist’s desire to “change the world.” Many readers, Drezner observes, prefer the “big ideas” of the latter to the complexity of the former. In a marketplace of ideas awash in plutocrat cash, it has become “increasingly profitable for thought leaders to hawk their wares to both billionaires and a broader public,” to become “superstars with their own brands, sharing a space previously reserved for moguls, celebrities, and athletes.”



....Continue reading this article at The New Republic.






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Date Added: 6/28/2017 Date Revised: 6/28/2017 4:00:34 PM

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